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Job market Anticipates Shift

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Job market Anticipates Shift

Braedon Harris, Co-Editor-in-Chief

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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, over 125 million people were employed on a full-time basis across the United States in 2017. Whether this be through temporary jobs or long-term careers, many Americans are actively engaged in the workforce.

 

Many perceive careers very differently, and some see them as simply what one does for living, synonymous with an occupation. Others, however, see a career as the progression through similar jobs over an extended period of time.

 

“A job is something that’s temporary, something to just get you money,” senior Justin Wanyoike said. “A career is like your passion. Everytime you wake up in the morning, you don’t feel like it’s work. You feel like it’s something that you love to do.”

 

Across the country, students from elementary to high school are encouraged not to settle for a job after graduation, but to take the best path to a career that suits them.

 

“I feel like teachers try to help you find what you want to do in life,“ Wanyoike said. “They don’t really push it on you, but they encourage you.”

 

Although students are being encouraged to strive for their dream jobs in highly sought after career fields, it doesn’t always work out. Many students go into college, choose a major and expect to land a job matching their major. However, according to data from the U.S Census Bureau, less than 30 percent of undergraduates end up with a job that matches their major.

 

This can be troublesome for many students, who spend substantial amounts of money to obtain a degree only to fail at finding a job in a related field.

 

“People get degrees for jobs that aren’t there,” Wanyoike said. “If you go into the medical field, engineering, computer science, cybersecurity, stuff like that, there’s job out there for that, so you’re gonna get a job. But let’s say you get a degree in history or an English degree, there aren’t that many jobs to get.”

 

Currently, the vast majority of jobs can be obtained with no more than a high school diploma. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 28 percent of all those employed have no formal education credential, receiving jobs such as retail salespersons, cashiers and janitors. Furthermore, 36 percent of those employed have no more than a high school diploma or equivalent, taking jobs in production, construction and office and administrative support.

 

“College isn’t necessary for all people,’” senior Jasleen Goraya said. “It really just depends on the career path you choose. If you’re already technically skilled you just need to start somewhere, build connections and work your way up.”

 

However, as society continues to progress, more and more jobs are expected to require post secondary degrees. According to the data taken in 2016, all of the post secondary categories combined are projected to grow by nearly 55 percent through 2024. Whereas the projected job growth for those with a high school diploma or less is just over 10 percent.

 

These projections would flip the current balance of job distributions in the U.S., with less than 4 percent of job growth expected to be in jobs by those with a high school diploma and 7 percent in those with no education requirement. With trends like this likely to continue in the long run, many changes will occur in the U.S. job market.

 

“There are always going to be jobs that do not require degrees,” Goraya said. “With that being said, it’s up to the next generation to decide if they want to compete for the top paying jobs and be competitive in the job market.”

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Braedon Harris, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Class of 2019.  I'm In MST and the Engineering program.  I didn't even choose to be in Newspaper, but it turned out pretty good.

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