Marine’s Family Misses Only Son

Back to Article
Back to Article

Marine’s Family Misses Only Son

Edith Perez

Edith Perez

Edith Perez

Braedon Harris, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Having a family member in the military is a struggle for millions of households. For sophomore Nataly Cardona, this became a reality when her older brother joined the Marines.

“After my brother graduated from high school he went straight into the Marines,” Cardona said. “First he went to boot camp in San Diego. After that he was stationed in Okinawa, Japan. Since he has only been in [the Marines] for two years that is the only place he has been stationed.”

Being in the military does not necessarily mean the person will be stationed overseas. Being categorized as active duty, meaning a person works for the military as though it was a civilian job, they will work five days a week and receive a month of paid vacation per year. Others who serve in the Reserves or the National Guard have training drills one weekend a month and two full weeks per year. Both the National Guard and the Reserves work part time, which allows them to be able to pursue civilian jobs. Family members in active duty will be gone a lot more than if they were in another sector of the military. Cardona’s brother is categorized as active duty.

“I only see him once a year around the holidays,” Cardona said. “Each month they are in service they get a couple of days of vacation, so he comes around Christmas to be with the family. [Since] he doesn’t come every year, it makes everyone kind of sad. The person who used to make everyone laugh and smile the most isn’t here to do that anymore. It took a while to get used to not seeing him around the house. But after a while we learned to accept the fact that he isn’t around.”

Learning to accept that her brother was in the Marines did not come immediately.

“At first [my parents] didn’t approve of him joining,” Cardona said. “They thought that he should go to college. [But] after a while they grew to accept that he wanted to go down that path. He enjoys being in the Marines, [and] it has made me realize [how much] they go through in order to protect the country.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email